Function of Auxiliary Finings

Auxiliary Finings

General Considerations
• Auxiliary fininqs aid the action of isinglass finings by enhancing the total negative charge, especially when contribution by yeast is low. This improves the electrostatic interaction between proteins and isinglass finings. Beers fine more quickly because of the larger floc size.
• Auxiliary finings are available in solution as acidified polysaccharides, silicates, alginates and formulated blends.
• Factors which need to be considered are the type of auxiliary finings, dosage rate, storage temperature and conditions, time of addition, fining performance, yeast count prior to fining and compactness of sediment.

Range of Values
• Sulphur dioxide content of liquid auxiliary finings is typically between 200 and 300 mg per litre.
• Solutions of auxiliary finings should be visually bright prior to use.
• Yeast counts are typically 0·5 x 106 – 2 x 106 cells per ml with a mean of 1·0 x 106 cells per ml.
• The dosage rate of auxiliary finings is typically 0·9 – 3·5 ml per litre (¼ – 1 pint per barrel), but is related to the isinglass dosage rate and depends on compactness of the sediment.

Operational Protocols
• Liquid auxiliary finings are stabilised with sulphur dioxide and stored in inert containers at ambient temperature There must be adequate ventilation in the storage area because levels of sulphnr dioxide particularly on delivery can be high.
• Addition is made in-line through a dosing pump as beer is transferred from fermenting vessel to racking tank or directly to tank or cask
• Addition of alginate auxiliary finings is made at least 4 hours before addition of isinglass finings. Due to the rapid action of silica based auliliaries they can be added either pre- or post-isinglass finings. The actual time of addition is determined by experience.

Measurement Protocols
• Every batch of finings should be inspected visually and examined for infection by micro- organisms.
• Fining action is monitored by making the equivalent addition of finings to appropriate samples of beer and noting daily the size of flocs, speed of fining action and clarity of fined sample
• A nine gallon cask is fined and stillaged in the sample cellar for a larger scale production check on the fining performance
• Finings contribute to sulphur dioxide levels in beer The levels of sulphur dioxide in samples of fined beer should be measured. Auxiliary finings supplied by Murphy & Son Ltd. will add in the order of 0·25 – 1 ppm SO2 to the beer at typical addition rates.

Take a look at our Auxiliary finings range

 

MURPHY AND SON LTD JOB VACANCY – LABORATORY MANAGER

Job Advert – Laboratory Manager

This role entails the management of all laboratory staff (currently a team of 6), in both Chemistry and Microbiology laboratories.

Work carried out in the laboratories covers: Quality Control testing of raw materials and all products manufactured on site in accordance with the ISO9001 Quality System, testing of samples supplied by customers and testing under the UKAS ISO 17025 banner.

The day to day duties involve:

Management

  • To coordinate both chemistry and microbiology laboratory staff on a day to day basis
  • To set and measure productivity targets
  • To undertake annual appraisals for all laboratory staff
  • To carry out one to one meetings and review staff objectives
  • To hold regular laboratory meetings
  • To train laboratory staff in relevant laboratory roles
  • To attend weekly management meetings
  • To liaise with other managers with regards to any company business that involves the laboratory

Laboratory

  • To confirm Quality Control testing of manufactured products and sign off batch cards
  • To compile laboratory reports to send out to customers
  • To liaise with customers regarding samples and to discuss the relevance of test results
  • To field customer technical queries via email and telephone
  • To provide laboratory testing quotes to customers
  • To liaise with the Technical Sales Representatives with regards to any specific customer analyses/trials
  • To ensure laboratory consumables are ordered and stock levels are correct
  • To provide cover in the absence of other laboratory staff
  • To develop and promote new methods and test procedures, in conjunction with the Product Manager and the R&D team
  • Extend the range of UKAS accredited testing offered to customers

Quality

  • Liaise with the Compliance department to meet the needs of and QRESH objectives
  • To carry out internal audits
  • To assist with external auditors on the day of auditing
  • To undertake the role of UKAS Quality Manager and UKAS Deputy Technical Manager

Attributes

  • Be a good all round manager
  • Have good communication skills
  • Have knowledge of good laboratory practices
  • Have knowledge of ISO9001 Quality Management systems
  • Have knowledge of ISO17025 UKAS systems
  • Preferably knowledge of BRC standards
  • Knowledge of the brewing, food and beverage industries would be an advantage
  • Have experience of working in, and preferably managed, a chemistry or microbiology laboratory

Hours: 8.30 – 5.00 Monday to Friday

Holidays: 22 days plus bank holidays rising to 25 days.

Salary: £28,000-£32,000 depending upon experience.

training day

If you would like to apply for the above position please could you send  your CV and a covering letter to Joanne.taylor@murphyandson.co.uk all applications will be treated as confidential.

The closing date for all roles is Friday 26th May at 12.00pm.

 

 

Water, Water Everywhere. Murphy and Son Ltd

Water, Water Everywhere

We take treating your liquor very seriously at Murphy’s. If you purchase any of our liquor treatments please remember you are entitled to a free liquor analysis and our technical support. We will recommend the most suitable treatment for your brewery.
Send in 50ml of your water to our Laboratory

Send in 50ml of your water to our Laboratory

Introduction

Beer contains approximately 90% water, and the importance of the liquor to final beer quality cannot be over-estimated. Historically a correlation was observed between the liquor composition of an area and the type of beer that the region could best brew. The Pale Ales of Burton-on-Trent and Edinburgh, Porters of London, Stouts of Dublin and Lagers of Pilsen are classic examples. Water falling as rain, hail, sleet or snow is pure, but dissolves gasses such as oxygen and carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. On reaching the ground the water runs off into rivers, streams and lakes and on in some cases to reservoirs. The composition of the water in the reservoirs is dependent upon the nature of the catchment area. In areas where the rocks are hard, the water will not penetrate deeply, and will be ‘soft’ – that is low in dissolved salts. In areas where the rocks are more permeable – gypsum obrewing liquorr limestone for example – water will penetrate readily and dissolve many minerals on its way to the reservoirs to become ‘hard’.

The water supplied by local Water Authorities is required to be potable – that is fit to drink and free from pathogenic organisms. In order to reduce microbiological counts chlorine will usually be added, but the water is not sterile. Fortunately however the micro organisms found in water are not beer spoilage organisms, being unable to survive the conditions of high ethanol and hop resin levels and low pH found in beers. So the objective of liquor treatment is to convert the water sent to us by the Water Authorities into acceptable brewing liquor. This we achieve by the removal of unwanted ions and addition of required levels of desirable ions

DWB Liquor Treatment from Murphy's

DWB Liquor Treatment from Murphy’s

Calcium

Of the ions required for brewing, calcium is by far the most important. This is because of the acidifying effect that calcium has on the wort.

Wort contains large amounts of phosphates derived from the malt, and these have a buffering effect – that is they tend to mop up hydrogen ions and keep the pH higher than desired. Calcium ions precipitate phosphates as insoluble calcium phosphate and release hydrogen ions into the wort. It is worth mentioning at this point that whilst the pH of the wort is critical, that of the water in the HLT is not. The pH of water may vary from about pH 5 to pH 8 dependent upon the levels of dissolved carbon dioxide – even de-ionised water can have pH levels as low as 5 after exposure to the air. However the carbon dioxide is driven off by heat in the HLT and the pH of the water will rise.

A combination of the presence of calcium ions and the decrease in pH has a number of effects on the brewing process:

The lower pH improves enzyme activity and thus wort fermentability and extract.

The optimum pH for ß-amylase activity is about 4·7. Wort produced from liquor containing no calcium has a pH in the order of 5·8 – 6·0, compared to values in the range of 5·3 – 5·5 for worts produced from treated brewing liquor. The activity of the ß-amylase then is greatly enhanced by the addition of calcium, this exo enzyme increasing the production of maltose from Amylose, and thus making worts more fermentable.

Calcium has an almost ‘chicken and egg’ effect in the precipitation of wort proteins, both during mashing and during the boil.

Protein-H + Ca2+ Protein-Ca + 2H+

The hydrogen ions released further reduce the pH which encourages further precipitation of proteins. Proteins are also degraded, that is converted to simpler substances by proteolytic enzymes called proteases. These are found in the malt, and have optimum activity at pH values of about 4·5 – 5·0. The reduction in pH then caused by the presence of calcium encourages proteolysis, further reducing protein levels and increasing wort Free Amino Nitrogen levels (FAN). FAN compounds are utilised by the yeast during fermentation for the manufacture of Amino acids, and an increase in FAN levels in the wort improves the health and vigour of the yeast. High protein levels in beers also have negative effects, making beer more difficult to fine and encouraging formation of hazes, in particular chill hazes. Product shelf life can also be adversely affected.

Calcium ions protect the enzyme a-amylase from inhibition by heat.

a-amylase is an endo enzyme, cleaving the internal 1,4 glucosidic links of amylopectin resulting in a rapid reduction in wort viscosity.

It can be seen then that the presence of calcium has positive effects on the activity of both a-amylase and ß-amylase, two of the most important enzymes in the brewing process.

The drop in pH encouraged by Calcium ions in the mash and copper helps afford the wort and subsequent beer produced a greater resistance to microbiological infection.

The reduced pH of the sparge liquor reduces extraction of undesirable silicates, tannins and polyphenols from the mash bed.

The extraction of such materials is encouraged by alkaline sparge liquor. These materials are very undesirable, contributing to harsh flavours, hazes in the finished beer and decreased beer stability.

Calcium precipitates oxalates as insoluble calcium oxalate.

This again occurs in both the mash tun and the copper. Oxalates cause hazes in finished beers and also contribute to the formation of beerstone in FV’s, CT’s and casks. Oxalates are also thought to promote gushing in certain beers, although this is not generally a problem to the micro brewer.

The presence of calcium reduces colour formation in the copper.

This is due to the reduction of extraction of colour forming compounds such as anthocyanogens and pro-anthocyanidins during the sparge. The reaction: Reducing Sugar + Heat Melanoidins is also inhibited.

Calcium ions improve beer fining performance.

Calcium ions encourage yeast flocculation – being a divalent Cation it has a natural affinity for negatively charged yeast cells.
With all the above advantages of the presence of calcium and reduction in pH there is one minor disadvantage.

The reduction in pH causes a decrease in hop utilisation, giving less bitter beers.

This increases hopping costs, since more hops will be required to achieve a desired level of bitterness. However the optimum pH for hop isomerisation as used in the commercial production of isomerised hop extracts is about pH 10, so a reduction from pH 5·8 in a mash with untreated liquor to pH 5·1 out of copper for a treated brew is not too critical.

You will see that much of the calcium added to the mash is lost – precipitated out as phosphate, proteinate or oxalate. Since calcium is specifically required in the copper for further precipitation of these materials it is common to add calcium to the grist or Hot Liquor Tank and to then make a second addition to the copper. Where this is not practical it is quite acceptable to make a larger addition to the grist or to the H.L.T.

Bicarbonate

This ion needs to be very closely controlled in order to achieve good beer. High levels of bicarbonate cause high pH values throughout the brewing process according to the equation:

It should be noted that bicarbonate ions are rather more effective at raising wort pH than calcium ions are at reducing it.
The conversion of bicarbonate to carbonic acid is reversible until heat is applied, which drives off the carbon dioxide. This effectively removes the acidic hydrogen ion from the system by using it to form a stable water molecule. The wort pH therefore remains high and all the advantages derived from the presence of adequate calcium levels and reduced pH are lost.

We therefore see the following:

  • Harsh after-tastes in the finished beer
  • Extract will be reduced due to lower ß-amylase activity
  • Reduced protein precipitation due to high pH
  • Worts and beer more prone to infection
  • Increased extract of undesirable materials in the sparge, notably silicates, polyphenols and tanning

The net result of this is then to decrease beer stability and shelf life and to increase the likelihood of troublesome hazes. Colour will be darker, and flavour will be detrimentally affected. Hop utilisation will be increased, giving more bitter beers. It is then essential to ensure removal of excess bicarbonate. You will recall from Figure 1 that a hard water may contain 250 mgs/l of bicarbonate. The maximum level that can be tolerated without adverse effect for the production of pale ales is 50 mgs/l, and the preferred level would be about 25 mgs/l. It should also be noted that whilst additions of calcium may be made to HLT, grist and copper, the removal of bicarbonate must be achieved in the Hot Liquor Tank.

This may be done in a number of ways:

Deionsiation: Very effective, but high capital and revenue costs.

Lime treatment: Addition of carefully controlled amounts of lime (calcium hydroxide) to the HLT will precipitate the bicarbonate as calcium carbonate.

There are 2 major drawbacks:

  1. The amount added needs to be exactly calculated and over addition may result in an overall increase in alkalinity.
  2. The precipitated calcium carbonate can form a sludge on the bottom of the HLT that will need periodic cleaning.

Boiling: This again is a traditional method of removal of bicarbonate (Temporary Hardness) but again has 2 drawbacks:

  1. Very expensive.
  2. Only effective where the alkalinity is present as bicarbonate. If the levels of sodium, potassium or magnesium carbonates or hydroxides present are significant boiling will not be effective.

Acid Treatment: Now the most widely used method, for a number of reasons:

  1. Relatively inexpensive.
  2. Easy to use and does not produce sludge in the HLT
  3. May add desirable anions – sulphate or chloride.
  4. Can use phosphoric or lactic acids if no anions are wanted – eg for lager beers.
AMS Murphy and Son Liquor Treatment

AMS Murphy and Son Liquor Treatment

It is essential to rouse the liquor when acid treating in order to encourage the removal of the carbon dioxide. This can have corrosive effects on the materials of construction of HLT’s if left in solution.

Magnesium:

Is an essential element of brewing liquor because it is required by yeast as a co-factor for the production of certain enzymes required for the fermentation process. It is invariable formulated into liquor treatments at relatively low levels.

However caution must be exercised for 3 reasons:

  1. Excess magnesium can interfere with the reactions of calcium because its phosphates are more soluble
  2. Above about 20 mgs/l magnesium can give beer a sour and bitter taste
  3. In excess magnesium has a laxative effect

Sodium:

Is present in all beers. Excessive levels are undesirable as it imparts a sour and salty taste at high concentrations. The flavour is more acceptable when the sodium is present as chloride than as sulphate.

Potassium:

Is, like magnesium, a yeast co-factor and is required at trace levels for satisfactory fermentations. It is more acceptable than sodium from a flavour point of view, giving a salty taste without the sour notes. It is also gaining some favour as Doctors warn of the effects of high sodium intake on blood pressure. However potassium salts are very much more expensive than the sodium equivalents, and in excess potassium has laxative effects on the beer.

Sulphate and Chloride:

It is convenient to discuss the effect of these two ions together. Much is made in brewing literature of the impact of these ions on beer flavour characteristics – sulphate gives beer a drier, more bitter flavour, whilst chloride imparts palate fullness and to an extent sweetness. However what must be noted is that it is the ratio of the concentrations of these two ions that is significant, rather than simply the actual concentrations. A ratio of about 2:1 sulphate to chloride is about right for a bitter beer, and it makes little difference if the actual values are 500:250 or 350:175 mgs/l. As will be seen in Figure 3 ratios of 1:2 sulphate:chloride are recommended for mild ales, whilst a ratio of 1:3 may give best results for stouts or porters.

Sulphate and Chloride: It is convenient to discuss the effect of these two ions together. Much is made in brewing literature of the impact of these ions on beer flavour characteristics – sulphate gives beer a drier, more bitter flavour, whilst chloride imparts palate fullness and to an extent sweetness. However what must be noted is that it is the ratio of the concentrations of these two ions that is significant, rather than simply the actual concentrations. A ratio of about 2:1 sulphate to chloride is about right for a bitter beer, and it makes little difference if the actual values are 500:250 or 350:175 mgs/l. As will be seen in Figure 3 ratios of 1:2 sulphate:chloride are recommended for mild ales, whilst a ratio of 1:3 may give best results for stouts or porters.

Sulphur is essential for the fermentation process, since the yeast needs to manufacture the two sulphur containing amino acids, cysteine and methionine. Some yeast strains will use sulphur from sulphate ions for this purpose and will then excrete any excess as sulphite ions. These can then be reduced to form hydrogen sulphide or sulphur dioxide. Both of these materials have characteristic pungent odours and even at low levels can give unacceptable sulphury noses to the beer. Bacteria also have the ability to produce a wide variety of sulphury off flavours, including rubber, garlic and cooked vegetable.

Nitrate:

Levels of Nitrate are beginning to drop generally due to greater control of the use of nitrogenous fertilisers. Nitrates themselves are not a problem at levels below 50 mgs/l, however they can be reduced by yeast or bacteria to form Nitrites. These ions can then react with wort amines to form Nitrosamines, which are carcinogenic.

Trace Ions:

Metals such as Iron, Manganese, Copper and Zinc may be found in small quantities in water and are all utilised by yeast at levels below 1 ppm. Higher levels can cause colloidal hazes and metallic off flavours, particularly with higher levels of Iron. Silica should also be at very low levels in brewing liquor because of the likelihood of colloidal hazes being formed. Ammonia should be absent in brewing liquors, being indicative of contamination by sewage. Fluorine, present in most waters at about 1 ppm for dental purposes, has no detectable effect on the brewing process. However Chlorine, used for sterilisation, may be at relatively high levels at certain times of the year. This can cause problems since chlorine is a very reactive chemical and will readily react with organics to form chlorophenols. These have a medicinal (T.C.P.) flavour which is in some cases detectable at levels below 1 ppb. Chlorine will be lost to some degree by the heat in the Hot Liquor Tank, but not all water used within the brewery is from that source. Some brewers may use untreated liquor to break down to gravity in fermenter, and rinsing following caustic or acid cleaning cycles will typically be with untreated mains liquor. One solution is to treat both Hot and Cold Liquor Tanks with 10 ppm of Salicon Liquid 169 (20 mls in 10 brls liquor) and rouse vigorously to remove the chlorine. The sulphur dioxide reacts with chlorine in the manner described below – reducing reactive, undesirable and potentially harmful chlorine ions to chlorides.



Typical Liquor Analyses for Beer Types:
Bitter Mild Porter Lager
Calcium 170 100 100 50
Magnesium 15 10 10 2
Bicarbonate 25 50 100 25
Chloride 200 200 300 10
Sulphate 400 150 100 10

Nitrate – As low as possible
Metals – Zn, Cu, Fe,Mn Less than 1 ppm All figures are in ppm (mgs/ltr)

ams200

AMS Liquor Treatment

Please take a look at Murphy’s Liquor treatment range.

 

WE HAVE A FEW SALE ITEMS

Due to all our new developments in the warehouse and production plant we have stumbled across a few stock items that are either obsolete or are nearing or past their best before date but still have good activity.

Yeast Quantity Best Before Price per pack
Mauri AWRI 1503 500g May-17 £23.44
Mauri Lager 497 500g Feb-17 £4.50
Munich Wheat Yeast 500g May-17 £30.56
Safspirit Malt Whiskey 500g Mar-17 £22.59
Safspirit American Whiskey 500g Jan-18 £21.19
Safspirit Fruit 500g May-17 £19.70
Safspirit Grain 500g Apr-17 £21.66

If you are interested in any of the above products please contact: frances.maud@murphyandson.co.uk

Job Vacancy: Sales/Commercial Manager

Sales/Commercial Manager

Reporting to Charles Nicholds and more generally to the executive Board.

The primary objective of the Sales/Commercial Manager is to promote and develop the Company’s sales opportunities through self supporting initiatives and the progressive management of the ‘external technical sales team that currently total 7 people including one person full time in the USA.

To manage and oversee the internal sales team including 4 internal orders takers.

To fulfil this role, you will need to be experienced with analysing all aspects of our sales data, product costing and profitability. By analysing our customer’s product mix, profitability and technical support, you will direct the ‘team’ to maximise their effectiveness.

Manage and oversee all our global distributors directly. Travel will be required to these accounts throughout the year.

The role entails researching the effectiveness of our competitors both home and abroad and using the information gained to improve our own competitive advantage.

As and when required, to be able to complete and present tenders, negotiate contracts and play an active role in the future costing and pricing initiatives of the Company.

You will co-ordinate our marketing, advertising, exhibitions and promotional activities, including all website issues.

The role will entail the investigation of potential new business, whether at new customers or with new products and to analyse any threats to existing business.

You will coordinate the introduction of new products, ensuring that all research, literature and promotion is carried out, including the training of all relevant staff.

You will be involved in promoting any training within the team that can have an impact on improving the Company’s customer focus. This may include best telephone practice, relevant information gathering by the technical team and sales order process operations. With proactive action on any issues which affects customer satisfaction and service expectations.

Actively involved in discussing, writing and delivering on company objectives for you team. Focusing predominantly on Quality, Consistency and Support. Including managing internal and external sales meetings using this as a monthly focus to tweak and direct your assessment of what is required to develop the successful growth of the Company’s sales performance.  At all times make recommendations to the Directors on anything that in your opinion would improve the technical team’s ability to operate smarter.

Salary: dependent on the level of experience.

To apply for the position please send your CV and covering letter to

charles.nicholds@murphyandson.co.uk

The closing date for applications is Friday 5th May 2017 at 12.00pm.

LET MURPHY & SON LTD HELP YOU ACHIEVE BEER STABILITY

Murphy and Son Ltd are proud to be the main UK distributors of a large range of stabilisers supplied by the following leading companies:

ASHLANDLOGO

Ashlands Stabilisers recognised worldwide for its Polyclar® range of products (PVPP) used for the stabilisation (longer shelf life and improved flavour) and clarification of beer and wine. ISP range includes products to remove haze-causing polyphenols (Polyclar®10 and Polyclar Super R), and for the simultaneous, balanced removal of haze causing polyphenols and proteins (Polyclar® Plus 730).

Polyclar® V and Polyclar® VT are available for wine clarification and removal of astringent flavours.

wr-grace--co-logo

Grace Stabiliser Grace has over 70 years of experience in the development of silica technology for the food industry, and actually pioneered the developed of a selective adsorbent for beer stabilisation.

DARACLAR® silica, made from silica gel, is a highly selective adsorbent developed specifically for breweries. With its specialised surface characteristics and unique pore structure.
DARACLAR® silica adsorbs only those proteins which cause haze formation in beer
DARACLAR® silica requires only a short period of time to work
DARACLAR® silica does not affect the flavour, clarity, colour and foam quality of beer
DARACLAR® silica may even eliminate the need for foam stabilisers in some cases.

Gold murphy logo

Murphy’s recommendations:

Polyclar 10 is a PVPP to remove polyphenols/tannins. Depending upon the beer and the shelf life required, dose rates vary from 10 g/hl  to 40 g/hl

DARACLAR® 920 is a silica hydrogel to remove proteins (It is a combination of proteins and tannins that produces haze). Dose rates 50g/hl to 100g/hl

polyclar and daraclar

It is important to chill beer to about -1 degrees centigrade  and hold for at least 24 hours (preferably longer) and maintain that temperature during filtration. It is also important to minimise oxygen in the product.

Tanks and lines may be purged with CO2 or N2. Ensure calm filling of vessels. But a little bit of fobbing into final container helps.

 

 

Using a microscope to help control yeast quality. Murphy and Son Ltd

For good brewing you need a healthy yeast with a good viability, a good cell count and free from contamination.  

microscope-kit

You can monitor the viability of your yeast by using a methylene blue stain, as dead or dying cells stain blue. The staining can be easily seen under a microscope.

You can perform a yeast count by using a Haemocytometer. A haemocytometer consists of a defined grid etched onto the slide surface. The number of cells per ml can be calculated.

There are two types of microbiological contamination, wild yeasts and bacteria, both these contaminants can cause hazes and off flavours.

You can monitor the presence and levels of contamination using the microscope, by identifying rod shaped bacteria (bacilli) and round shaped bacteria (cocci).

You can observe for wild yeast by looking at cell shape, size, opacity and uniformity. This often goes hand in hand with knowing your own yeast and getting to know its appearance under the microscope .

If you are interested in purchasing a microscope from Murphy and Son Ltd here are the following options:

SP30 Microscope £185.59
http://murphyandson.co.uk/store/home/357-sp30-microscope.html

microscope

  • The SP30 has many features that are normally found on microscopes of much greater price
  • The optical parts are made from achromatic corrected glass and are standard Royal Microscopical Society (RMS) size
  • The monocular head rotates through 360° and has a wide field x10 good quality eyepiece
  • The quadruple position rotating turret is equipped with x4, x10, x40 and x100 achromatic RMS objectives, which when used commonly need magnifications of x10 and x400
  • The x40 and x100 objectives have a spring loaded front lens element that retracts the lens into the objective on contact with the slide. In addition the stage has a safety stop with a similar purpose
  • The slide platform is full mechanical stage with drop down coaxial controls that makes fine movement of the stage in the required direction very easy
  • The double vernier scale also allow position identification on the slide
  • The SP30 base has inbuilt LED illumination with rheostat control that allows the intensity of the lighting to be adjusted to suit the magnification in use

Microscope kit
£341.48 http://murphyandson.co.uk/store/home/356-microscope-kit.html

The kit includes:

  • The SP30 Mimicroscope-kit-2croscope
  • Pastuer Pippettes x5
  • Haemocytometer/counting chamber including x2 coverslips
  • Methylene Blue Stain
  • sterilin bottles x2
  • Instructions

Diacetyl Control: Using ALDC to brew the beer you intended

What is ALDC? Alpha acetolactate decarboxylase.

Benefits of ALDC:

·        Reduces Diacetyl production
·        Significantly reduces maturation times
·        More efficient vessel utilisation
·        Improves beer quality

Diacetyl is well known among brewers and beer drinkers – distinctive for its buttery aroma and flavour. It is both produced and removed naturally by ale and lager yeast strains alike during the course of a typical fermentation and many reliable house yeasts leave a little residual diacetyl in the finished beer. As such it is fairly common with many traditional and popular beer styles to contain some level of diacetyl in their flavour profile.

Murphy and Son has worked with a number of craft breweries in the USA and United Kingdom who wanted to produce modern, hoppy pale ales without any flavour of diacetyl, but that was brewed using their existing house ale strain of yeast. The concentration of diacetyl was initially monitored to see how it was being lowered by the breweries controlled fermentation and how effective the yeasts own ability to reabsorb and reduce the diacetyl during maturation was.

Murphy and Son analysed this beer for diacetyl levels in their laboratory in Nottingham, England. It was found that by applying ALDC to the wort at the same time as the yeast was added in a concentration of 3 to 4 grams per hectolitre, the flavour would be brought below threshold in the finished beer as desired (figure 1).

text

ALDC is commonly used in lager production to lower maturation time, the rate-limiting step, by converting acetolactate (the precursor of diacetyl) to a flavourless end-product called acetoin. (figure 2 below).

capture

In this instance the ALDC was able to boost the diacetyl lowering effect of the yeast in the same way, culminating in the desired low concentrations of diacetyl in the finished beer and allowing the brewer to broaden the spectrum of beers produced without the need for another yeast.

As ale fermentations are much faster a little more ALDC was required than may be needed for lager, but at 3 to 4 grams per hectolitre of ALDC it was still found to be an economical solution to the brewer.

Murphy and Son Ltd sell ALDC in 1kg pack sizes!

Murphy & Son’s 2017 On Site Training Day Dates 2017

Why not take part in one of our training days either at your own site or at our historic Prince of Wales Brewery Site in Nottingham?

You will be able to discuss the brewing process with one of our master brewers. Either learning for the first time or retraining in one or more of our specific categories.

All courses cost £85 + vat and include food and drink. Each delegate is given a USB containing the presentations to take home on the day.

All courses here at Nottingham start around 9.30am and finish around 4.30pm.

Available dates are shown below, please book as soon as possible to avoid disappointment.

If travelling is an issue, you can arrange a training day at your own brewery or at a local location. We can help you create a bespoke course for you. We will charge you our daily consultancy rate plus travel expenses and you can have as many delegates as you wish. We can even arrange for other brewers in your  area to attend, who will pay you for the course.

Please contact Frances Maud on Frances.maud@murphyandson.co.uk for more details or to make a booking.

LABORATORY DAY 2017

  • Thursday 27th April
  • Thursday 24th AugustCANCELLED!

Introducing you to basic science to produce beer with consistent quality. This course will cover the malting process, the mash, enzymes, pH buffering, the boil, protein coagulation, colour increase and flavour changes. You will be advised what equipment can be used to monitor pH’s, colour and bitterness and haze and there will be a demonstration on how to perform an optimisation and much more.

training-day-2

QUALITY ASSURANCE AND QUALITY CONTROL AWARENESS 2017

  • Thursday 25th May
  • Thursday 28th September

A training day that runs through the “world” of QA and QC. Aim is to arm the brewer ready for their initial foray with the subject. The course will cover: process monitoring and the process, microbiology, record keeping and quality systems i.e what does SALSA and HACCP want and what is it?

kettle-fining-addition

adding-isinglass

 

(PAST) BEER CLARITY 2017

  • Thursday 16th February
  • Thursday 29th June

adam-finingkettle-optimisations

This course will cover liquor composition and effect on stability, Brewhouse control, carrageenan, isinglass and auxiliary finings and cask preparation. The day ends with a very constructed troubleshooting session which leads to question and answers.

(PAST) YEAST MANAGEMENT 2017

  • Thursday 30th March
  • Thursday 13th July

This will cover the general overview of yeast, the fermentation process, handling live yeast, microbiology and cleaning and basic CIP.

trioSafeDepositNCYC

Please contact emily.kerrison@murphyandson.co.uk for more details or to make a booking.