Category Archives: Frequently Asked Questions

Lager, Lager, Lager

When some very enterprising German brewers decided to store their beer in the frozen Bavarian Alps through the summer time in the early nineteenth century, little did they know of the impact there new “Lager” creation would have on the world of beer.  Some of these brewers were so moved by the potential of this wonderous brew that they started to leave their Bavarian breweries to spread the word around Europe and refine this new brewing art.  Many on the continent were so moved by the potential of Lager and the Lagering technique that many brewing enterprises started making related products of their own giving rise to styles like the Red Lagers of Vienna.  Much credit also needs to be given to Bavarian brewer Josef Groll who, in 1842, took the brave step of heading to a little-known brewing town called Pilsen in the Czech Republic to try out his new lager recipe.  Following on from this original Pilsner (Pilsner Urquell), innovations and developments in the likes of glass bottle manufacture and refrigeration coupled with a good helping of migration meant lager quickly became a worldwide success.

Lager is as popular as ever and whether its Pilsner, Helles, Vienna Lager or Schwarzbier you are considering brewing, Murphy and Son is the place for everything you need for a flavoursome quality lager.

Liquor Treatment

Our much treasured, annual free of charge liquor analysis now includes a suggested liquor treatment for lager style beers as standard.  If you have not had you liquor checked for a while and you are a Murphys customer please send 50ml of untreated water to our lab for us to check out for you.

Our suggested lager treatment aims for a brewing liquor with adequate calcium for good brewing enzyme activity, yeast flocculation and oxalate and protein precipitation whilst mimicking the low sulphate and chloride levels of Munich and Pilsen for a crisp, light flavour.  This is best achieved with suitable additions of lactic acid to reduce alkalinity with low levels of calcium sulphate and calcium chloride to increase calcium ions.

Malt

Our new closer ties with Simpsons Malt means that we now have in stock ready for dispatch Finest Lager Malt (crushed).  This highest quality malt is slightly higher in Total Nitrogen and slightly under-modified so head / foam and mouthfeel will survive the lagering process. To add to this quality base malt, we can also supply a range of crystal malts, caramalt, wheat malt and Vienna malt (all crushed) direct from our warehouse.

Hops

Whether you are looking for traditional varieties of Noble Czech Saaz and German Hallertau hops, or looking to add a dry hop twist to your brew with new world hop pellets, we are very proud of our close relationship with Charles Faram which means we can supply the best hops around to suit your requirements.

Yeast

On the dried yeast front we are pleased to hold stock of Lallemand Diamond Lager Yeast and three different Fermentis Lager Yeasts.  We also supply wet yeast cultures from the National Collection of Yeast Cultures (NCYC) which houses a vast range of lager strains originating from all over the world which can add the precise character you are looking for.

Flavour control

Diacetyl and Sulphur flavours can be problematic in lagers to help keep things under control we have the perfect products to help.

When added to wort at the start of fermentation, the enzyme Alpha Acetolactate Decarboxylate (ALDC) acts on the diacetyl precursor alpha acetolactate converting it to acetoin.  If alpha acetolactate is not present diacetyl can’t be formed so no buttery off flavours in your beer and conditioning time can be reduced.

To help keep sulphur off flavours out of your beer, Murphys have developed two zetolite products for the job.  Zetolite 65, when added to wort at the start of fermentation will prevent the formation of sulphur off flavours whilst if you notice the undesirable sulphurous aromas in your fermented product, the addition of Zetolite 63 will stimulate your yeast to reduce H2S and DMS aromas during maturation.

Don’t forget…

…an exuberant bright appearance is important with lagers and at Murphys we carry a huge range of finings and stabilisers to help achieve the desirable crisp look from brewers clarex to Super F, Silica and PVPP products, the Murphys Technical team is on hand to get this just right for you.  PGA is also a handy product to help achieve a perfect looking head on dispense.

For further information on any of the products discussed or for general advice and trouble-shooting with lager brewing please contact the Murphys Technical Team.

We Sell Key Kegs!!!!

Author: Iain Kenny, Technical Sales Representative, Murphy & Son Ltd

Contact the technical team on techsupport@murphyandson.co.uk

Murphy Training Days 2018

We are happy to announce the dates and initial details of our training days for 2018!

Murphy Training Days take place between 9.30am and 4.30pm, cost £95 +VAT and include lunch, with a maximum of 15 places available on each. In addition to which, each delegate will receive a USB containing the presentations from the day and a certificate.

All our training takes place at our historic Prince of Wales Brewery site in Nottingham and offers the opportunity to discuss and learn more about a particular element of the brewing process with members of our technical team. Murphy Training Days are pitched at a beginner to intermediate level and designed for those looking to expand or refresh their brewing knowledge, with opportunity for questions and in-depth discussion throughout.

To check availability and reserve your place, please email events@murphyandson.co.uk and include the training date(s) you’re interested in, your email address, full name, brewery name and a contact number (as relevant).

Once booked you will receive a confirmation email and be contacted by a member of our Customer Service Team to organise payment. Closer to the date we will circulate a detailed agenda for the day and all the logistical information you might require, but please don’t hesitate to send a question our way should you have one in the meantime.

Murphy Training Day 1 – IMPROVING THE STABILITY OF BEER

AVAILABLE DATES: Thursday 22nd February or Thursday 26th July 2018.
Led by Master Brewer and Technical Sales Representative Nick Brading.

This course will cover liquor composition and effect on stability, brewhouse control, carrageenan, isinglass and auxiliary finings. The training will also delve into the importance of stable beer in cask preparation and small pack production. Providing all the basics needed to brew quality beer with confidence.

Murphy Training Day 2 – YEAST: MANAGING YOUR BREWING PARTNER

AVAILABLE DATES: Thursday 22nd March or Thursday 30th August 2018.
Led by Technical Brewer and Technical Sales Representative Adam Johnson.

There is no beer without yeast! Our yeast training provides an introduction to this vital microorganism, options available to the modern brewer and a guide to using and handling yeast in the brewery. This will provide a general overview as well as a more in depth discussion of the fermentation process, handling live yeast, maintenance and microbiology and last but most certainly not least, brewery hygiene.

Murphy Training Day 3 – LABORATORY TECHNIQUES IN BREWING

AVAILABLE DATES: Thursday 26th April (FULLY BOOKED! Waiting list only) or Thursday 27th September 2018.
Led by Master Brewer and Technical Manager Richard Haywood.

The day will include an examination of water analysis and its impact on beer quality, from core principles to specialist analysis and application. After this the team will focus on the application of chemistry and microbiological testing methods in the brewery, and finally, a demonstration of how to perform a finings optimisation. Come away with the skills to create consistent beer with confidence.

This training features practical activities in our lab, so is limited to a maximum of 10 attendees only.

Murphy Training Day 4 – QUALITY MANAGEMENT FOR BREWERIES

AVAILABLE DATES: Thursday 24th May or Thursday 25th October 2018.
Led by Master Brewer and Technical Manager Richard Haywood.

This days training will provide an overview of a Quality Management System, thus arming the brewer ready for their initial foray with the subject. Also covered will be HACCP, due diligence programs and last but not least, SALSA and legal requirements. Come armed with your questions, as they’ll be lots of time to discuss and answer these throughout.

Murphy Training Day 5 – THE BASICS OF PRODUCTION FOR KEG, CAN AND BOTTLE

AVAILABLE DATES: Thursday 28th June or Thursday 29th November 2018.
Led by Technical Brewer and Technical Sales Representative Iain Kenny.

The day looks at the central role of stable beer in keg, can and bottle production and the practical techniques that you can apply to help ensure this. Also covered will be an introduction to the different carbonation, filtration and filling methods available, both as a starting point to begin or an aid to refine in-house production. Advice on selecting the right contract packager and further insight from the team at Applied Minerals will also feature.

If you require that we come to you and/or tailor the day to your particular requirements, then we recommend you request a Murphy Master Class. Our master classes range from a presentation to your staff at your brewery on any of the subjects featured in our training, right through to a full days walk through and detailed assessment of your process. Simply email events@murphyandson.co.uk to find out more.

What should you expect from this year’s malt specifications?

We’ve been discussing the expected malt specifications for the coming year with our malt suppliers and wanted to feed back so you can prepare and tweak your recipes as required.

The malt nitrogens coming into breweries with the new seasons malt are likely to be higher than usual, at around 1.7%. The winters are not expected to be quite as high, but are still above average, predicted at up to 1.5%. This is a result of environmental factors, as last year saw low rainfall which made it harder for the barley to establish properly. Blame the British weather, it’s a national habit and we brewers are no different. You can however, prepare for this and if you need any technical support in doing so, we’re always on hand. The key implications revolve around your use of copper and auxiliary finings, the rates of which will need to be reoptimised once malt is in breweries and will likely increase. You can expect to see the first malts of this harvest in breweries across the country from mid-February onwards.

Could do with a bit more information on the matter? No problem!

It starts with the farmers, who sow different varieties of malting barley in autumn and early winter, known as “winters” and again in spring, known as “springs”, both of which are harvested from early July onwards. The latter are becoming more popular as they tend to be easier to grow but do require more fertiliser to get a decent yield by harvest time. Winters don’t require as much fertiliser making them cheaper for the farmer but extract value to the brewer tends to be less.

In brewing, we refer to the percentage of protein present in the malt as percentage nitrogen, it is quoted on malt analyses and used as a price guide and quality indicator. For example, feed barleys have a high protein content to feed the animals. Brewers however, want nitrogens to be lower, at around 1.4-1.5%. This provides enough yeast growth, flavour and beer foam without any substantial problems with haze, stability and excess yeast growth, above these levels and the later can become an issue. There is therefore, always a focus on this parameter at harvest and purchase time.

How come the percentage nitrogen is predicted as being higher in British malt this year?

The issue is in fact that of last year, where we saw a prolonged dry winter and spring in the main growing regions of the UK, resulting in crops not establishing well. To help crops along, farmers spread higher amounts of fertiliser which in turn pushed the nitrogens up. This is because the fertiliser is taken up by the growing plant and deposited in the developing ears of corn which are the grains harvested as barley for the malt crop. Had they not done this, the crop may well have failed altogether, something which did happen in a small number of districts resulting in some shortage too. The maltsters work with what they get off the fields, blending barleys to get an overall consistency which they can sell to brewers. However from a brewer’s perspective, with already high nitrogens and a limited supply, the quality of malt coming onto the market is weaker when compared to the previous years’ crop. Therefore, the forecast is less stable beer.

As brewers there are various techniques at our disposal to control protein (nitrogen) in the brewing process, and this is where we at Murphys specialise! Carrageenan and auxiliary finings are both process aids that remove this protein. It follows therefore, that brewers will require more of these products to treat the higher nitrogen malt expected this year. Something which we can support with our optimisation services and technical expertise, provided to you by a team of master brewers. Choosing Murphys will be an invaluable decision in 2018.

Like to perform your own optimisations? We’ve just the kit you need!

The Murphy Copper Finings Optimization Kit, which contains all the equipment required, as well as documentation on how to perform your own optimisations.

Kegging, canning or bottling? Have you considered the benefits of Murphy’s Super F?

Since its launch,  Super F has proven invaluable to many of the top craft breweries worldwide, providing great results for beer produced for keg, can and bottle whether filtered or unfiltered.

What is it?

Super F is a rapid action fining, made using our own special formulation of silicate and polysaccharide for rapid sedimentation.  This unique blend makes Super F effective at fining out yeast as well as being an effective finings agent against potential haze forming colloids like proteins.

How’s it used?

Super F is best added when beer is moved from fermenting vessel to conditioning tank with care taken to ensure good mixing.  It is not a suitable addition for cask conditioned beer and should never be dosed directly to cask.  Action of this fining is quite rapid with excellent results achievable within 48 hours.  Super F packs a real punch so dose rates are low with typical doses 75ml-175ml per hl will achieve great clarity (often less than 1 EBC) and a compact sediment.

Benefits

The rapid action of Super F will significantly reduce residency time in conditioning / maturation vessel.  When using this product, the load on centrifuges and filters will be significantly reduced due to brighter beer being presented for further processing.  This gives considerable time and money savings per run.

When kegging unfiltered beer, yeast counts and protein content in the product will be lower and more consistent, leading to a more stable product.

Super F is also vegan friendly and is easy to store (just don’t freeze it!) with a shelf-life of 6 months from manufacture date. Furthermore, Super F is also in accordance with German Purity Law (set into force by the German provisional beer law in its current version 9 [6]).

Finings trials

Introducing a new finings regime to any brewery is a big step.  At Murphy and Son, we pride ourselves on our technical support so before any brewer uses this product we ask that they send a representative two litre sample of their beer to our laboratory where our Research and Development Scientist Dr Ruth Newby and the rest of the lab team will set up optimisation trials.  This will give valuable information on haze and sediment levels for different dosages to provide a starting point for trials and additions in the brewery.  As always, our technical sales team will also be on hand to aid and advise on the products use.

Author: Iain Kenny
Technical Sales Representative

For further information or to setup a trial please contact our technical team on
technical@murphyandson.co.uk

Christmas opening hours and deliveries at Murphy & Son

When’s the last time I can order before Christmas?

The nights are drawing in and the mornings becoming crisp and cold, which can only mean one thing Christmas is fast approaching! So, we thought we should let you know our Christmas opening hours and delivery times, to allow you to prepare.

Opening times (we do not open on weekends)

Date Opening Hours
Friday 22nd December 2017 9am-12pm
Monday 25th December ‘17 Closed
Tuesday 26th December ‘17 Closed
Wednesday 27th December ‘17 Closed
Thursday 28th December ‘17 Closed
Friday 29th December ‘17 Closed
Monday 1st January 2018 Closed
Tuesday 2nd January ‘18 Open as usual, 9am-5pm

Delivery Times

Date Order Placed Earliest Delivery Date
Monday 18th December 2017 Thursday 21st December 2017
Tuesday 19th December ‘17 Wednesday 3rd January 2018
Wednesday 20th December ‘17 Thursday 4th January ‘18
Thursday 21st December ‘17 Friday 5th January ‘18
Friday 22nd December ’17
(Closed until 1st January 2018)
Friday 5th January ‘18
Tuesday 2nd January 2018 Friday 5th January ‘18

Collections before and after the Christmas Break

  • To collect before Christmas you must order by 4pm Monday 18th December and collect by Wednesday 20th December.
  • Orders made after the 18th Dec can be collected from Wednesday 3rd January 2018 at the
    earliest.
  • Please call us on 0115 978 5494 to organise your collection as normal.

All orders placed online during our Christmas closure will be processed on Tuesday 2nd January and delivered from the 5th January 2018 at the earliest.

Please bear in mind that our order line will be closed during this time (12pm Fri 22nd Dec 2017 – 9am Tues 2nd Jan 2018), so we recommend waiting to order until our return (Tues 2nd Jan ‘18).

To speak to one of our team about this information or regarding another subject, please refer to the contact details listed here.

Many thanks, and here’s to a record breaking Christmas!

The Murphy & Son Team

IONIC COMPOSITION – Brewing Liquor

Originally, brewing started up in areas where the water supply was suitable for the production of beer, but with the wide geographical spread of modern breweries and modern supply systems, the water available to the brewer can be at best variable and at worst quite unsuitable. The natural water in areas such as Burton-upon-Trent proved excellent for production of bitter ale beers and many brewers will now treat their incoming supply to adjust pH and salts content to emulate Burton water. Where dissolved salt levels are low, it is usually sufficient to make up the concentrations to the desired levels. The most important ions are calcium (Ca++), sulphate (SO4–), bicarbonate (HCO3-), and to a lesser extent magnesium (Mg++), and chloride (Cl-).

CALCIUM (Ca++)
Calcium is a very important constituent and performs a number of functions:-

  • Decreases the pH during mashing and wort boiling, favouring enzyme activity
  • Promotes the precipitation of unwanted proteins in the kettle, hop back or whirlpool
  • Promotes yeast flocculation at the end of fermentation
  • Promotes head retention on beer
  • Reacts with oxalate to form an insoluble salt, preventing gushing in beer

SULPHATE (SO4–)
Sulphate is added to give beer a drier and more bitter effect

BICARBONATE (HCO3-)
Bicarbonate has the opposite effect to calcium in that it causes an increase in pH, so reducing the desirable effects of calcium

MAGNESIUM (Mg++)
Magnesium levels are typically rather lower than calcium and in addition its salts are more soluble,
so it has less effect on pH and flavour than calcium

CHLORIDE (Cl-)
High chloride concentrations are not usually found in water; its addition can impart palate fullness

WATER HARDNESS
Both temporary and permanent hardness can be treated using acidic products

WATER HARDNESS
The presence of calcium or magnesium ions in water gives rise to hardness, the familiar effect of which is to diminish or prevent the formation of soap lather. Calcium (or magnesium) bicarbonate in water is termed temporary hardness, so called because it can be removed simply by boiling the water and precipitating insoluble carbonate together with the evolution of carbon dioxide. Calcium or magnesium salts other than bicarbonates, typically sulphates or chlorides, are termed permanent hardness because they cannot be removed by boiling. Instead, other treatments such as sequestering, ion exchange are used.

Acid Treatment
This is now the most widely used method, for a number of reasons:-

  • It is relatively inexpensive
  • It is easy to use and does not produce sludge in the hot liquor tank
  • Products such as AMS will add desirable anions, sulphate and chloride
  • It can be achieved by using products such as Phosphoric Acid or Lactic Acid if no anions arewanted – for example in lager beers

It is essential to rouse the liquor when acid treating in order to encourage the removal of the carbon dioxide. This can have corrosive effects on the materials of construction of hot liquor tanks if left in solution.

Our Returnable Drum Service

We here at Murphy and Son are committed to operating a strict environmental policy to help reduce our carbon footprint. As part of this, we operate a returnable drum service. 

Alongside helping protect our planet, our returnable drum policy allows you to avoid the time consuming and often expensive process of disposing of drums and IBCs personally. We are always happy to collect your empty Murphy & Son drums and IBCs from your site, simply agree a date and time with our team by calling sales on 0115 978 5494.

To cover the cost of supplying and transporting our containers throughout the UK and to allow for damaged containers and the process of laundering, label removal, cap replacement and micro swabbing, we do charge a small fee per container. The majority of this fee is credited back to you upon receipt of your returned containers.

A full break down of any and all costs of this service can be found below.

Container size and type
Charge per container
Refundable amount per returned container
Non-refundable carriage charge per container
25 litre drum £5.83 £4.73 £1.10
200 litre drum £20.70 £18.39 £2.31
600 litre IBC £111.42 £105.08 £6.34
1000 litre IBC £201.63 £183.90 £17.73

There are also a few other conditions of service we’d like to tell you about.

  • All containers must be returned in a rinsed, clean and sound condition.
  • To comply with Food Standards, we ask that nothing except the product we supply is stored in said container. Contaminated containers will be refused return and/or refund.
  • We only except returns within 12 months of purchase.
  • Please stack any empty containers on a pallet and wrap ready for transportation
    We’re happy to provide a roll of shrink wrap for this purpose, just give us a buzz to request.
  • We only accept containers supplied by Murphy & Son Ltd, other suppliers’ containers cannot be accepted.
  • This service is only available on the UK mainland

If any of the above conditions aren’t met, then we reserve the right to refuse refund.

Packing your drums ready for collection…

25 litre containers Palletise in a 4×4 layout, minimum of 2×16-32 units and no more than 4 drums high, a total of 64 units
200 litre containers Palletise a minimum of 2 containers with a maximum of 2×4 per pallet, a total of 8 units
If the number of containers you use is very small, we will accept a pallet with less items if this is pre-agreed and within the required 12 month return time.

We’re committed to ensuring the quality and efficiency of this service, therefore if you have any questions please don’t hesitate to get in touch via info@murphyandson.co.uk or by calling our Sales Team on 0115 978 5494.

Thank you from all the Murphy & Son team, for your continued custom and helping us do our bit for the environment.

Happy brewing!

Addition of Copper Finings Murphy and Son Ltd

General Considerations

• Copper finings are derived from seaweeds and the active ingredients are carrageenans and furcellarans. They are available as dried seaweed, e.g. Irish Moss, or as extracts in the form of either pellets or powders.
• Copper finings can be added directly to the copper. Alternatively powders can be slurried with cold liquor prior to addition.
• The optimum rate of addition of finings should be determined annually when starting the new season’s malt or whenever there is a change in the type or supplier of malt.
• The rate of addition of finings will affect the clarity of both hot and cooled wort. Incorrect addition of copper finings (both over and under) can give poor fining action in the cooled wort and beer which fines with difficulty.

Range of Values

• Optimum rates of addition may vary from one malt variety to another, from season to season and from brewhouse to brewhouse. Murphys are happy to offer an annual optimisation service to our customers, either in our labs or on-site.
• Typical rates of addition are in the order of 1·0 – 5·0 gms per Hectolitre (10 ppm to 50 ppm, 1·63 – 8·15 gms per barrel).• Hot breaks should consist of large flocs in bright wort. Cold breaks should be a heavy fine sediment in bright wort.
• The haziness of worts from the heat exchanger should be within the range of 2 – 6 E.B.C. haze units. If worts are too bright fermentation problems are sometimes encountered because the release of carbon dioxide and consequent ‘stirring action’ that such a release promotes, are hindered.

Operational Protocols

• When casting to a hop-back, finings are added during the last 5 to 15 minutes of boiling. If the practice is to recycle worts at the hop-back finings can be added at this point. When using a Whirlpool, finings should be added at casting from the copper.
• Whatever method of addition is used the copper finings must be evenly dispersed.
• Rates of addition should be optimised according to results obtained.

Measurement Protocols

• The formation of hot breaks is assessed visually after sampling from the copper at casting.
• Cold breaks are assessed visually after sampling from the cold wort mains and allowing to stand for a minimum of 2 hours.
• Rate of addition of finings; a graph is drawn of casting, gravity against rate of addition of copper finings and breaks are indicated as excellent, good or poor. The rate of addition is altered when poor results are observed.

Kettle Finings at Murphy & Son

Brewing Audit

Build up of Beerstone

NIPAC B  – Beerstone Remover

Corner-Technical

Beerstone removal

As a brewer you may have a problem with beerstone build-up in brewing vessels and containers.
Beerstone is a compound called calcium oxalate, and if not completely removed can harbour microorganisms. Beerstone is a common factor in wild yeast infections within breweries, it can also act as a nucleation point and cause gushing.
The removal of this material is carried out by using a concentrated formulation of nitric and phosphoric acids.

Nipac B is designed primarily for this application in breweries and is formulated to be low foaming and is suitable for use in recirculation applications. It can be used as an alternative to caustic based detergents in breweries for the cleaning of bright beer tanks and tankers whilst under CO2 atmosphere. A gel version exists for manual application where recirculation of the product is not possible.

https://murphyandson.co.uk/store/75-beerstone-removal

BENEFITS OF NIPAC B

· Excellent mineral and protein removal
· Aids removal of beer and milk stains
· Safe for use on Stainless Steel
· Can be used under CO2 atmospheres
· Suitable for use in CIP applications.
For more information and dosage rates please click on the following:
NIPAC B Technical Data sheet. Please contact our sales line or sales email to purchase this product.

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Hygiene from Holchem

Function of Auxiliary Finings

Auxiliary Finings

General Considerations
• Auxiliary fininqs aid the action of isinglass finings by enhancing the total negative charge, especially when contribution by yeast is low. This improves the electrostatic interaction between proteins and isinglass finings. Beers fine more quickly because of the larger floc size.
• Auxiliary finings are available in solution as acidified polysaccharides, silicates, alginates and formulated blends.
• Factors which need to be considered are the type of auxiliary finings, dosage rate, storage temperature and conditions, time of addition, fining performance, yeast count prior to fining and compactness of sediment.

Range of Values
• Sulphur dioxide content of liquid auxiliary finings is typically between 200 and 300 mg per litre.
• Solutions of auxiliary finings should be visually bright prior to use.
• Yeast counts are typically 0·5 x 106 – 2 x 106 cells per ml with a mean of 1·0 x 106 cells per ml.
• The dosage rate of auxiliary finings is typically 0·9 – 3·5 ml per litre (¼ – 1 pint per barrel), but is related to the isinglass dosage rate and depends on compactness of the sediment.

Operational Protocols
• Liquid auxiliary finings are stabilised with sulphur dioxide and stored in inert containers at ambient temperature There must be adequate ventilation in the storage area because levels of sulphnr dioxide particularly on delivery can be high.
• Addition is made in-line through a dosing pump as beer is transferred from fermenting vessel to racking tank or directly to tank or cask
• Addition of alginate auxiliary finings is made at least 4 hours before addition of isinglass finings. Due to the rapid action of silica based auliliaries they can be added either pre- or post-isinglass finings. The actual time of addition is determined by experience.

Measurement Protocols
• Every batch of finings should be inspected visually and examined for infection by micro- organisms.
• Fining action is monitored by making the equivalent addition of finings to appropriate samples of beer and noting daily the size of flocs, speed of fining action and clarity of fined sample
• A nine gallon cask is fined and stillaged in the sample cellar for a larger scale production check on the fining performance
• Finings contribute to sulphur dioxide levels in beer The levels of sulphur dioxide in samples of fined beer should be measured. Auxiliary finings supplied by Murphy & Son Ltd. will add in the order of 0·25 – 1 ppm SO2 to the beer at typical addition rates.

Take a look at our Auxiliary finings range