Category Archives: Manual Handling

Lager, Lager, Lager

When some very enterprising German brewers decided to store their beer in the frozen Bavarian Alps through the summer time in the early nineteenth century, little did they know of the impact there new “Lager” creation would have on the world of beer.  Some of these brewers were so moved by the potential of this wonderous brew that they started to leave their Bavarian breweries to spread the word around Europe and refine this new brewing art.  Many on the continent were so moved by the potential of Lager and the Lagering technique that many brewing enterprises started making related products of their own giving rise to styles like the Red Lagers of Vienna.  Much credit also needs to be given to Bavarian brewer Josef Groll who, in 1842, took the brave step of heading to a little-known brewing town called Pilsen in the Czech Republic to try out his new lager recipe.  Following on from this original Pilsner (Pilsner Urquell), innovations and developments in the likes of glass bottle manufacture and refrigeration coupled with a good helping of migration meant lager quickly became a worldwide success.

Lager is as popular as ever and whether its Pilsner, Helles, Vienna Lager or Schwarzbier you are considering brewing, Murphy and Son is the place for everything you need for a flavoursome quality lager.

Liquor Treatment

Our much treasured, annual free of charge liquor analysis now includes a suggested liquor treatment for lager style beers as standard.  If you have not had you liquor checked for a while and you are a Murphys customer please send 50ml of untreated water to our lab for us to check out for you.

Our suggested lager treatment aims for a brewing liquor with adequate calcium for good brewing enzyme activity, yeast flocculation and oxalate and protein precipitation whilst mimicking the low sulphate and chloride levels of Munich and Pilsen for a crisp, light flavour.  This is best achieved with suitable additions of lactic acid to reduce alkalinity with low levels of calcium sulphate and calcium chloride to increase calcium ions.

Malt

Our new closer ties with Simpsons Malt means that we now have in stock ready for dispatch Finest Lager Malt (crushed).  This highest quality malt is slightly higher in Total Nitrogen and slightly under-modified so head / foam and mouthfeel will survive the lagering process. To add to this quality base malt, we can also supply a range of crystal malts, caramalt, wheat malt and Vienna malt (all crushed) direct from our warehouse.

Hops

Whether you are looking for traditional varieties of Noble Czech Saaz and German Hallertau hops, or looking to add a dry hop twist to your brew with new world hop pellets, we are very proud of our close relationship with Charles Faram which means we can supply the best hops around to suit your requirements.

Yeast

On the dried yeast front we are pleased to hold stock of Lallemand Diamond Lager Yeast and three different Fermentis Lager Yeasts.  We also supply wet yeast cultures from the National Collection of Yeast Cultures (NCYC) which houses a vast range of lager strains originating from all over the world which can add the precise character you are looking for.

Flavour control

Diacetyl and Sulphur flavours can be problematic in lagers to help keep things under control we have the perfect products to help.

When added to wort at the start of fermentation, the enzyme Alpha Acetolactate Decarboxylate (ALDC) acts on the diacetyl precursor alpha acetolactate converting it to acetoin.  If alpha acetolactate is not present diacetyl can’t be formed so no buttery off flavours in your beer and conditioning time can be reduced.

To help keep sulphur off flavours out of your beer, Murphys have developed two zetolite products for the job.  Zetolite 65, when added to wort at the start of fermentation will prevent the formation of sulphur off flavours whilst if you notice the undesirable sulphurous aromas in your fermented product, the addition of Zetolite 63 will stimulate your yeast to reduce H2S and DMS aromas during maturation.

Don’t forget…

…an exuberant bright appearance is important with lagers and at Murphys we carry a huge range of finings and stabilisers to help achieve the desirable crisp look from brewers clarex to Super F, Silica and PVPP products, the Murphys Technical team is on hand to get this just right for you.  PGA is also a handy product to help achieve a perfect looking head on dispense.

For further information on any of the products discussed or for general advice and trouble-shooting with lager brewing please contact the Murphys Technical Team.

We Sell Key Kegs!!!!

Author: Iain Kenny, Technical Sales Representative, Murphy & Son Ltd

Contact the technical team on techsupport@murphyandson.co.uk

IBC BUNDS FOR SALE

IBC bund stands for sale (used but in really good condition).

Suitable for 1,000 litre tanks for all your IBC spill containment needs. The bund stands are constructed from high impact resistant GRP and incorporate a lining that is resitant to most chemicals. Please check compatability of chemical if in doubt. Dimensions: w1570mm x D1670mm x H650mm.

Offers welcome! Collection prefered.

Sold as seen. First come first served. 

 

Any queries please feel free to phone or email Fran Maud on 01159785494 or frances.maud@murphyandson.co.uk

The new impact resistant MurphyHallam Layer Board

We at Murphy & Son Ltd are proud to announce a new design of layer broad, produced in collaboration with Hallam Plastics; the M&H Layer Board. Our design is more durable, weather resistant, safe and strong.

Layer boards are a staple in every brewery and used throughout the supply line. They’re not, however, without their bugbears; prone to cracking in frosty conditions, warping under heavy use and collecting rain water (a cold shower every brewer has begrudgingly suffered once). So at Murphy & Son we thought it about time someone reinvented the wheel.

As with every Murphy product, our Layer Board is designed with the brewer and brewery in mind. It’s compatible with numerous automated systems and manufactured from High Density Polyethylene (HDPE), a superior non-brittle plastic that won’t crack or split in sub-zero temperatures and is impact resistant. Manufactured using engineered structural foam (ESF), the board boasts a high strength to weight ratio, compared to conventional injection moulding techniques. Plus, we’ve even added a simple drainage system so rain water can no longer collect. HDPE is stronger, more durable, more rigid and more resistant to the sunlight’s UV rays than conventional polypropylene, ensuring safer loading and unloading for draymen and fewer breakages.

The board’s superior manufacture is coupled with business acumen. It’s 100% recyclable and returnable for supply chain cost effectiveness. Plus, our boards can be customised; available in a range of colours and with the option to add a logo. A radio-frequency identification tag facility is also available upon request, to enable accurate tracking, deter theft and enhance security. We’ve left no stone unturned.

Interested in learning more about our new MurphyHallam Layer Board design or looking for a quotation? Please contact Peter Lawley on 07917 305140 or
pete.lawley@murphyandson.co.uk

SALE! P-handled trucks and chemical bunds

We have some discontinued stock for sale:

P-handled sack trucks for sale £40.00 each. If you want more than 50 then £30.00 each

P handle

IBC BUNDS STANDS FOR SALE. (Used but in really good condition).

Suitable for 1,000 litre tanks for all your IBC spill containment needs. THe bund stands are constructed from high impact resistant GRP and incorporate a lining that is resitant to most chemicals. Please check compatability of chemical if in doubt. Dimensions: w1570mm x D1670mm x H650mm. £300 each. Any queries just phone Fran Maud 01159785494

chemical bund

We have six available, please contacts Frances Maud for more details. frances.maud@murphyandson.co.uk

The Murphy’s guide to kegging

Brewing Auditkeg

Introduction

Kegged beer is a product which has been chilled and filtered, usually carbonated then packaged into pressurised metal containers which have a spear or extraction device of some description to aid dispense. In this way it is a different beverage to cask beer although often starts out brewed in the same way. The ability of the brewer to keg enables him to exploit different sales channels compared to cask where his keg beer can tolerate longer shelf life requirements, dispense points with no cellar cooling or sporadic turnover. Typical shelf life for a keg beer for the UK market is 12 weeks whereas for export, anything over 9 months is required.

Processing

Raw materials, brewhouse and fermentation processes are the same as for cask beer. It is in the preparation of the beer for packaging that the major changes occur. The first step is in the maturation. Beer destined for kegging is usually chilled to as low a temperature as the brewer can get it. The lower the better as this precipitates chill haze so it helps to have used carrageenan in the brewhouse too. A beer kept at -2.0˚C can be filtered after 48hrs, -1.0˚C would be 4 days, but if a beer can only be kept at 4 or 5˚C, it may be better to keep it for several weeks.

The second step is a filtration stage. This is to remove all yeast and as much protein and other material that would otherwise promote the formation of haze and off-flavour. Filtration can be through cellulose sheets or cartridge filters of different porosity or by using a kieselghur (diatomaceous earth) filter. All these techniques achieve the same thing; the production of a star bright beer which maintains its chemical and physical stability for the length of shelf life required by the customer. In practice beer is pumped from the cold tank through the filter and collected in a bright beer tank. At all stages it is important to keep air, in particular oxygen from contacting the beer. Oxygen readily reacts with residual proteins and hop resins in the beer to form compounds that eventually lead to oxidised flavours and haze which detract from the flavour. Therefor the rough beer tank often has a top pressure of CO2 gas acting as a blanket as the tank empties and likewise the receiving bright beer tank has a CO2 atmosphere to do the same as it fills.

Keg beer has a higher carbonation than its cousin in cask and this is achieved by carbonating the beer. The most efficient way is to do this inline as the beer exits the filter and fills the bright beer tank. However it can be done by carbonating the bright beer tank directly although this risks stripping out hop aroma and causing floaters through collapsed fob. A typical keg beer carbonation could range between 1.4 to volumes (cask beers are rarely greater than 1.0vol).

Packaging

Once in the bright beer tank, keg beer is packaged into kegs as soon as possible. The product although stabilised by filtration, is not sterile so most brewers fill their kegs after first flash pasteurising. Pasteurisation is the name given to heat treatment of a liquid to render it microbiologically safe. The amount of pasteurisation given is measured in pasteurisation units, PU’s, defined as the amount of heat delivered to kill microbes in a unit of time. 1 PU is the amount of microbial death achieved at 60˚C for 60 seconds. The scale is logarithmic and can be found from tables but keg beers are generally given around 20 PU’s equivalent to holding beer at 72˚C for a 15 – 20 seconds. The whole packaging process, including pasteurisation, is done under pressure to prevent the loss (fobbing) of CO2. The pasteuriser feeds the keg racker, usually via a buffer tank to cope with variable flows seen during keg filling. Kegs are washed on a specially designed washer as they need to be de-ullaged, cleaned, sterilised, rinsed and back-pressured prior to filling with the pasteurised beer.

Due to possible damage to the beer at the elevated temperatures of pasteurisation, beer can be sterile filtered instead. This usually involves passing the beer through a series of Filter Cartridges, the final cartridge being 0.45 micron.

After filling, kegs are check-weighed to comply with trading standards legislation, labelled and a tamper-proof keg cap placed over the filling/dispense point to protect the contents.

Considerations

This is the basic process of kegging beer. It is obvious that a different process technique and different equipment is required to keg beer. The underlying principle is to bring a greater stability to the beer to deliver a longer shelf life.

Some further considerations about this process are given below:

  • Even longer shelf life can be achieved through chemical stabilisation in cold tank prior to filtration by using silica gels, PVPP or enzymes according to the raw materials used and shelf life desired by the brewer.
  • There are many different types of keg fitting to found in pubs, and some of the one trip kegs have their own fitting. Your market needs to be investigated when considering keg and fitting type.
  • The prevention of oxygen contact throughout the whole process is imperative to achieve the shelf life stated by the brewer. Oxidised beer is really unpleasant to drink and indicates a fault in the above process. It is difficult to prevent oxygen ingress but permitted anti-oxidants are available to minimise the inevitable contact, e.g. ascorbic acid, sulphur dioxide (max. permitted in beer before declaration is 20ppm).
  • It can be seen that much capital equipment is required to install the correct processing equipment. However keg beer can be made employing sterile filtration technology which precludes the need to pasteurise with its risk on flavour change and energy requirement. Sterile filtering is made immediately after the rough filtering step and produces a microbially stable beer that can be carbonated and kegged as described.
  • The introduction of another product stream to the brewery requires more management, knowledge and expertise. It is worth considering purchasing additional quality control equipment like CO2 and O2 analysers especially to assist with the control of these important parameters.

Murphy’s How to!!! – Assembly of 3 and 5 Litre Polypins

How to Assemble a 3 and 5 litres Polypin

The polypin will come with a brown cardboard outer box

polypin1

A clear inner liner

A plastic flow tap

A plastic cover for use in transport

Note: The plastic cover cap can be used to seal the polypin for transit. If this is being used then the perforated sections should not be removed before assembly as the cap will fit inside of them. When swapping the cap for the tap stand the polypin on its base unscrew and replace, checking the tap is securely in place. Lower the polypin slowly check to ensure the tap is closed and not leaking.

Assembly Using Tap Fitting

Step 1

Squeeze the sides of the box together

This will force the base sections to lock together

polypin2

Step 2

Stand box up and insert filled polypin.

The flap with the perferated circule should be in the downwards position relative to the tap.

polypin3

Step 3 (If using tap)

 

Remove perforated sections

Fold the large side flap down first followed by the two smaller flaps.

Finally fold up bottom flap

(For cap use do not remove perforated sections)

polypin4

Step 4

Securing using vinyl tape

polypin5

Step 5

Pull Tap forward and enjoy

polypin6

Assembled Dimensions

Width    165mm

Depth   175mm

Height   155mm