Tag Archives: calcium sulphate

Beerstone Remover – Nipac B – A Nitric and Phophoric Acid Blend

NIPAC B  – Beerstone Remover

Corner-Technical

Beerstone removal

As a brewer you may have a problem with beerstone build-up in brewing vessels and containers.
Beerstone is a compound called calcium oxalate, and if not completely removed can harbour microorganisms. Beerstone is a common factor in wild yeast infections within breweries, it can also act as a nucleation point and cause gushing.
The removal of this material is carried out by using a concentrated formulation of nitric and phosphoric acids.

Nipac B is designed primarily for this application in breweries and is formulated to be low foaming and is suitable for use in recirculation applications. It can be used as an alternative to caustic based detergents in breweries for the cleaning of bright beer tanks and tankers whilst under CO2 atmosphere. A gel version exists for manual application where recirculation of the product is not possible.

https://murphyandson.co.uk/store/75-beerstone-removal

BENEFITS OF NIPAC B

· Excellent mineral and protein removal
· Aids removal of beer and milk stains
· Safe for use on Stainless Steel
· Can be used under CO2 atmospheres
· Suitable for use in CIP applications.
For more information and dosage rates please click on the following:
NIPAC B Technical Data sheet. Please contact our sales line or sales email to purchase this product.

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Hygiene from Holchem

 

Consultancy Corner – Master Brewer Graham Moss

Graham's consultancy buisiness

Graham’s consultancy buisiness

CONSULTANCY CORNER – GRAHAM MOSS

Graham is a well known UK master brewer with over 35 years experience in the brewing and processGraham Moss 5 industries. He has worked closely with Murphy and Son and breweries of all sizes from the mid 1980’s, and has built up a close working relationship with the team at Murphy’s and other key industry suppliers.

He is an accomplished brewing professional, with a Masters degree in Malting and Brewing Science from the prestigious British Brewing School in Birmingham (1986), Master Brewer (IBD, London 1991), Masters in Business Administration (Hull 1997), as well as a Bachelors degree in Biochemistry (Sheffield 1983).

Graham Moss 6Graham gained a “golden ticket” position with Scottish and Newcastle Breweries Ltd (now Heineken). In this position Graham received in depth training and Management experience in all aspects of the brewing industry, taking secondments at many sites and in many different departments. He accepts he was very fortunate for the experience obtained. Areas covered included traditional brewhouses, automated breweries, Fermentation, Maturation, Filtration, Cask and Keg Packaging, Bottling, Canning, Logistics, Dispense; with further secondments in Malt, Hops, Laboratories, Engineering projects. Ales and Lagers. During the brutal rationalisation in the industry in the 1990’s Graham worked at Whitbread Boddington’s, where he remembers routine brewing of 1800 barrels per Shift, 10 shifts a week!

Graham is well experienced in project management work. He has completed several hundredGraham Moss 1 assignments building breweries, large and small, all over the world. His MSc thesis was mixed gas dispense systems and his MBA thesis was in developing a national beer brand. His Mossbrew consultancy is an engineering and training business and he is also a stakeholder in the Ministry of Ale, a building he acquired as a derelict shell in 2000, refurbished and re-opened, still going 15 years later. Here the team operate a showroom brewery and an introductory brewing training course. Memories of installing a brewery in Barbados when it was hit by Hurricane Ivan in 2004, cause a humanitarian disaster, and also working with some lovely customers, and their families, in the brewing industry.

Graham Moss 3 

Graham’s Tips for a successful Brewery Business.

  1. Have good quality and professional looking point of sale material.

  2. Keep a close eye on the cash flow.

  3. Brew beer according to a quality system, make sure you understand which are the critical control points, “Quality by Simplicity”.

  4. Don’t be afraid to pay for an annual audit by an industry professional, this could save you money in terms of energy usage, hop usage, quality failures, safety and regulation lapses.

Contact

www.mossbrew.co.uk

gm@mossbrew.co.uk

graham moss 7

The Murphys at Murphy and Son Ltd

Albert John Murphy

Murphy and Son has been at the heart of the brewing community since 1887.

Albert John Murphy was born in the St James district of Bristol on the 20th of September 1857 to James Murphy and Mary Ann Jerfferies. The youngest of seven siblings, AJ learned the trade through his time as a brewing chemist for Sutton and Phillips in the 1880’s. Seven years later he used this knowledge to set up the fledgling company the Vanguard Chemical Works based in Leeds pioneering the liquor treatments for Burtonisation.

As well as researching ground-breaking techniques and products for the brewing industry AJ gardening developed formulations for his passion of gardening including the still available Murphy’s Tumbleweed. By this time he had married Emily Grace Newton, between them they had five children; Harold, Grace, Bertha, Phyllis and Alice.

AJ was among the first to realise the importance of formulating individual’s water treatment regimes to enhance the water supply for beer qualities because of this he founded the Bureau of Biotechnology specialising in teaching the fundamentals of brewing. The range of products offered expanded rapidly to include preservatives, fining agents, cleaning products and yeast foods.fv

A change of name happened in 1911 turning the Vanguard Chemical Works into Murphy and Lonsdale then finally in 1918 into Murphy and Son. AJ’s son, Harold Newton Murphy, eventually left the business to set up a car dealership while the Lonsdales moved to America to set up business links. After his passing on August 26th 1940 the business was put into a trust for AJ’s descendants. This is still the case today with 97% of the shares being owned by the trust.

 

Lab Training Day – 24th September 2015

LAB TRAINING DAY

We still have spaces available on our lab training day, this comprehensive course covers, liquor composition, kettle, auxiliary and isinglass optimisations and demonstrations, microbiology practicals, a presentation on consistency, quality and due diligence. These courses always end with a troubleshooting session which is well received. If you are interested please contact Frances Maud who will be happy to book you a place.

At each training day we always ask our delegates to give us their feedback, please take a look at the comments that were made at our last Laboratory Training Day.

“Broad content base, usability of information impartial”

“Kettle optimisation and introductory talk were very good”

“Practical sections were my favourite bits”

“Content was useful. Well-structured day, lunch was excellent”

“Finings, Liquor treatment, yeast were well covered”

“All content well structural and evenly distributed”

“All detail measured and time managed sufficiently”

“Great day and very informative”

“Overall a very useful day – thank you”

“Very good”

“I would recommend the course”

“Very good thanks”

This course will be the last one for the year. We will be re-running all courses in 2015 starting in February. Please keep an eye out for flyers or alternatively please contact Frances Maud

For information regarding all our training days please take a look at all the links on the right.

We are our own stand at Brau this year!!! 1-336 in Hall 1

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WE ARE HAVING OUR OWN STAND AT BRAU THIS YEAR

Every year we have the pleasure of exhibiting at Brau in Germany under the umbrella stand of the Brewing, Food and Beverage Industry suppliers association commonly known as the BFBi, although we will still work closely with the BFBi, this year we have decided to detach ourselves and have our own stand. BRAU Beviale is one of the most important European trade fairs for the production and marketing of beer and soft drinks. The annual industry get-together ensures a successful mixture of an extensive range of beverage raw materials, technologies, logistics and marketing. A really worthwhile event to attend. We shall be exhibiting on stand 1-336 in Hall 1 and the exhibition is to be held from the 10th to the 12 of November, at the Nurnberg Messe, Nuremberg, Germany. If you are attending please feel free to visit or arrange for an appointment.

FREE kettle, isinglass and auxiliary fining optimisations if you purchase our clarification products plus free liquor analysis, if you purchase our liquor treatments.

Our products and services help the brewing industry to help control their processes, minimise losses, maximise yields and to help run a more efficient brewery. Our unique selling point is that each product is backed up with free technical support.

Our friendly team of brewing experts offer services which give advice with all types of brewers’ problems. Our laboratory offers free kettle, isinglass and auxiliary fining optimisations if you purchase our clarification products plus free liquor analysis, if you purchase our liquor treatments.

dwb 1Liquor Treatments

Liquor treatments are vitally important to the brewing process. By converting your water supply into acceptable brewing liquor you will gain many benefits such as controlling your alkalinity, enabling optimum pH levels throughout the process which improves enzyme activity, extract yield, fermentability, clarity and stability.

Send in 30-50ml sample of your liquor to our laboratory with a cover letter, we will email you an analysis of your ions and recommend water treatments. Remember this service is free of charge for those who purchase our liquor treatments and you can have your water tested annually.

For more information regarding liquor treatments, why don’t you read the following article:

http://www.murphyandson.co.uk/murphyandson/water.html

akaClarification products

For customers who purchase our kettle fining, to obtain a precise dosage rate please send in 1 litre of your unfined wort to our laboratory.

For Isinglass and Auxiliary optimisations please send in 1 litre of your unfined beer.

All sample must be in plastic containers, fully labelled and accompanied by a cover letter with full contact details.

Please find the following article regarding clarification in beer:

http://www.murphyandson.co.uk/murphyandson/all-bright.html

Murphy and Son Ltd
Laboratory
Alpine Street
Old Basford
NG6 0HQ

Monitoring your pH throughout the process will help contribute to a good extract yield and fermentability.

1345814738-55770400

The pH of the liquor will have little effect on the pH of the wort and beer. Alkalinity and Calcium are more important in pH control.
Once you have established correct levels of these ions it is advisable to follow the guidelines of typical pH measurements in the brewing process shown below. Hand-held pH meters can be purchased from Murphy & Son Ltd for £58.50.
Please be aware that if you purchase our liquor treatments, you may be entitled to free laboratory testing in the lab and free technical support to ensure you use the correct dosage rates.
Please find the following pH values that are typical measurements and are useful as guidelines when monitoring you pH values.

Raw Liquor pH 6.0-8.0
Treated Liquor pH 6.0-8.0
Mash pH 5.2-5.5
1st Runnings pH 4.8-5.2
Last Runnings pH 5.4-5.6
Wort in Copper pH 5.1-5.4
Wort after boil pH 4.9-5.3
Beer after fermentation pH 3.7-4.2

Alkalinity
Alkalinity is mainly caused by calcium carbonate and bicarbonate. The alkalinity of your liquor plays a very important role in pH control. It causes high pH values throughout the brewing process. Hydrogen ions are removed from solution, thus wort pH remains high which results in low extract yield; presence of undesirable protein components; worts and beers prone to infection; increased extraction of silicates, polyphenols and tannins during sparge and harsh “after tastes” in the finished beer.

Calcium
Reduces the pH during mashing and wort boiling which improves enzyme activity. This is achieved by the calcium ions precipitating phosphates present in the wort as insoluble calcium phosphate which in turn releases the hydrogen ions in the wort which reduces the pH.
3Ca2+ + 2HPO42- → Ca3 (PO4)2 ↓ + 2H+
The optimum pH of the enzyme α-amylase is about 5.7 and that of ß-amylase is about 4.7. Therefore an optimum range in the mash of pH 5.2-5.5 promotes the production of sugars from starch thus making worts more fermentable.
Promotes the precipitation of unwanted proteins in the kettle, hop back or whirlpool. Calcium also has an effect on the precipitation of undesirable wort proteins both during mashing and during the boil

Protein – H + Ca2+ → Protein – Ca↓ + 2H+
The hydrogen ions released further reduce the pH which encourages further precipitation of proteins. The reduction of pH then causes protein breakdown by the enzymes present in malt, this reduces protein levels and increases wort Free Amino Nitrogen levels (FAN).
Improves health and vigour of the yeast. This is a result of FAN compounds being utilised by the yeast during fermentation.

  • Improves clarity and stability of the finished product. Reduced protein levels in beers make beer easier to fine and less prone to haze formation, in particular chill haze. The shelf life of the final product is also improved.
  • Calcium ions protect α-amylase enzyme from inhibition by heat. Calcium ions also improve enzyme activity.
  • Reduces the risk of infection. The drop in pH encouraged by Calcium ions in the mash and copper provides a greater resistance to microbiological infection.
  • Reduces extraction of silicates, tannins and polyphenols. These materials contribute to harsh flavours, hazes in the final beer and decreased stability.
  • Reduces beerstone and in some cases prevents gushing in beer. Oxalates derived from the malt contribute to the formation of beerstone and are also thought to promote gushing in beer. Calcium reacts with oxalates to form insoluble calcium oxalate which is precipitated out in the mash.
  • Reduces colour formation during wort boiling. The extraction of colour forming compounds are reduced during sparging.
  • Improves beer fining performance. Calcium ions promote yeast flocculation at the end of fermentation.

For typical levels of ions for different beer styles, Double click following table to see figures…

typical levels of ions

Optimum pH for Mash Enzymes
• Alpha amylase 5.3 – 5.8
• Beta amylase 4.9 – 5.4
• Proteolytic 4.6 – 5.0
• Peptidase 4.6 – 5.0
• Phytase 5.0 – 5.2
• Mash 5.1 – 5.4

For further reading:

http://www.murphyandson.co.uk/murphyandson/water.html

dwb

DWB is a formulated blend of powdered salts to increase mineral content of brewing liquor to produce the desired beer characteristics.