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Consultancy Corner – Master Brewer Graham Moss

Graham's consultancy buisiness

Graham’s consultancy buisiness

CONSULTANCY CORNER – GRAHAM MOSS

Graham is a well known UK master brewer with over 35 years experience in the brewing and processGraham Moss 5 industries. He has worked closely with Murphy and Son and breweries of all sizes from the mid 1980’s, and has built up a close working relationship with the team at Murphy’s and other key industry suppliers.

He is an accomplished brewing professional, with a Masters degree in Malting and Brewing Science from the prestigious British Brewing School in Birmingham (1986), Master Brewer (IBD, London 1991), Masters in Business Administration (Hull 1997), as well as a Bachelors degree in Biochemistry (Sheffield 1983).

Graham Moss 6Graham gained a “golden ticket” position with Scottish and Newcastle Breweries Ltd (now Heineken). In this position Graham received in depth training and Management experience in all aspects of the brewing industry, taking secondments at many sites and in many different departments. He accepts he was very fortunate for the experience obtained. Areas covered included traditional brewhouses, automated breweries, Fermentation, Maturation, Filtration, Cask and Keg Packaging, Bottling, Canning, Logistics, Dispense; with further secondments in Malt, Hops, Laboratories, Engineering projects. Ales and Lagers. During the brutal rationalisation in the industry in the 1990’s Graham worked at Whitbread Boddington’s, where he remembers routine brewing of 1800 barrels per Shift, 10 shifts a week!

Graham is well experienced in project management work. He has completed several hundredGraham Moss 1 assignments building breweries, large and small, all over the world. His MSc thesis was mixed gas dispense systems and his MBA thesis was in developing a national beer brand. His Mossbrew consultancy is an engineering and training business and he is also a stakeholder in the Ministry of Ale, a building he acquired as a derelict shell in 2000, refurbished and re-opened, still going 15 years later. Here the team operate a showroom brewery and an introductory brewing training course. Memories of installing a brewery in Barbados when it was hit by Hurricane Ivan in 2004, cause a humanitarian disaster, and also working with some lovely customers, and their families, in the brewing industry.

Graham Moss 3 

Graham’s Tips for a successful Brewery Business.

  1. Have good quality and professional looking point of sale material.

  2. Keep a close eye on the cash flow.

  3. Brew beer according to a quality system, make sure you understand which are the critical control points, “Quality by Simplicity”.

  4. Don’t be afraid to pay for an annual audit by an industry professional, this could save you money in terms of energy usage, hop usage, quality failures, safety and regulation lapses.

Contact

www.mossbrew.co.uk

gm@mossbrew.co.uk

graham moss 7

Keep Cool this Summer…..Isinglass is temperature sensitive

Be aware of the ideal storage temperatures for your products this will help it retain its quality and effectiveness.
For isinglass the storage temperatures are as follows:
Store in cool conditions away from direct sunlight.
Keep container sealed when not in use.
Recommended storage temperature :5-15°C
Minimum storage temperature:1°C
Do not allow the product to freeze
The shelf life at recommended storage temperature is 8 weeks from the date of manufacture.
Please refer to your technical datasheets for storage conditions for other product.aka

FREE kettle, isinglass and auxiliary fining optimisations if you purchase our clarification products plus free liquor analysis, if you purchase our liquor treatments.

Our products and services help the brewing industry to help control their processes, minimise losses, maximise yields and to help run a more efficient brewery. Our unique selling point is that each product is backed up with free technical support.

Our friendly team of brewing experts offer services which give advice with all types of brewers’ problems. Our laboratory offers free kettle, isinglass and auxiliary fining optimisations if you purchase our clarification products plus free liquor analysis, if you purchase our liquor treatments.

dwb 1Liquor Treatments

Liquor treatments are vitally important to the brewing process. By converting your water supply into acceptable brewing liquor you will gain many benefits such as controlling your alkalinity, enabling optimum pH levels throughout the process which improves enzyme activity, extract yield, fermentability, clarity and stability.

Send in 30-50ml sample of your liquor to our laboratory with a cover letter, we will email you an analysis of your ions and recommend water treatments. Remember this service is free of charge for those who purchase our liquor treatments and you can have your water tested annually.

For more information regarding liquor treatments, why don’t you read the following article:

http://www.murphyandson.co.uk/murphyandson/water.html

akaClarification products

For customers who purchase our kettle fining, to obtain a precise dosage rate please send in 1 litre of your unfined wort to our laboratory.

For Isinglass and Auxiliary optimisations please send in 1 litre of your unfined beer.

All sample must be in plastic containers, fully labelled and accompanied by a cover letter with full contact details.

Please find the following article regarding clarification in beer:

http://www.murphyandson.co.uk/murphyandson/all-bright.html

Murphy and Son Ltd
Laboratory
Alpine Street
Old Basford
NG6 0HQ

Faults in the process which may cause slow, or slow to start fermentations

Brewing Audit

Slow, or slow to start fermentation can be due to faults in the process such as insufficient aeration which can be solved by rousing or increasing the rigour of rousing of your wort.

Premature attemperation can be another cause, which can be solved by pitching more yeast, agitation or running hot liquor through the attemperator.

Another cause may be that the ambient temperature may be too low this can be rectified by running hot liquor through the attemperator or increase ambient temperature using insulation, heating etc.

click here for more information