Tag Archives: stable beer

Murphy Training Days 2018

We are happy to announce the dates and initial details of our training days for 2018!

Murphy Training Days take place between 9.30am and 4.30pm, cost £95 +VAT and include lunch, with a maximum of 15 places available on each. In addition to which, each delegate will receive a USB containing the presentations from the day and a certificate.

All our training takes place at our historic Prince of Wales Brewery site in Nottingham and offers the opportunity to discuss and learn more about a particular element of the brewing process with members of our technical team. Murphy Training Days are pitched at a beginner to intermediate level and designed for those looking to expand or refresh their brewing knowledge, with opportunity for questions and in-depth discussion throughout.

To check availability and reserve your place, please email events@murphyandson.co.uk and include the training date(s) you’re interested in, your email address, full name, brewery name and a contact number (as relevant).

Once booked you will receive a confirmation email and be contacted by a member of our Customer Service Team to organise payment. Closer to the date we will circulate a detailed agenda for the day and all the logistical information you might require, but please don’t hesitate to send a question our way should you have one in the meantime.

Murphy Training Day 1 – IMPROVING THE STABILITY OF BEER

AVAILABLE DATES: Thursday 22nd February or Thursday 26th July 2018.
Led by Master Brewer and Technical Sales Representative Nick Brading.

This course will cover liquor composition and effect on stability, brewhouse control, carrageenan, isinglass and auxiliary finings. The training will also delve into the importance of stable beer in cask preparation and small pack production. Providing all the basics needed to brew quality beer with confidence.

Murphy Training Day 2 – YEAST: MANAGING YOUR BREWING PARTNER

AVAILABLE DATES: Thursday 22nd March or Thursday 30th August 2018.
Led by Technical Brewer and Technical Sales Representative Adam Johnson.

There is no beer without yeast! Our yeast training provides an introduction to this vital microorganism, options available to the modern brewer and a guide to using and handling yeast in the brewery. This will provide a general overview as well as a more in depth discussion of the fermentation process, handling live yeast, maintenance and microbiology and last but most certainly not least, brewery hygiene.

Murphy Training Day 3 – LABORATORY TECHNIQUES IN BREWING

AVAILABLE DATES: Thursday 26th April (FULLY BOOKED! Waiting list only) or Thursday 27th September 2018.
Led by Master Brewer and Technical Manager Richard Haywood.

The day will include an examination of water analysis and its impact on beer quality, from core principles to specialist analysis and application. After this the team will focus on the application of chemistry and microbiological testing methods in the brewery, and finally, a demonstration of how to perform a finings optimisation. Come away with the skills to create consistent beer with confidence.

This training features practical activities in our lab, so is limited to a maximum of 10 attendees only.

Murphy Training Day 4 – QUALITY MANAGEMENT FOR BREWERIES

AVAILABLE DATES: Thursday 24th May or Thursday 25th October 2018.
Led by Master Brewer and Technical Manager Richard Haywood.

This days training will provide an overview of a Quality Management System, thus arming the brewer ready for their initial foray with the subject. Also covered will be HACCP, due diligence programs and last but not least, SALSA and legal requirements. Come armed with your questions, as they’ll be lots of time to discuss and answer these throughout.

Murphy Training Day 5 – THE BASICS OF PRODUCTION FOR KEG, CAN AND BOTTLE

AVAILABLE DATES: Thursday 28th June or Thursday 29th November 2018.
Led by Technical Brewer and Technical Sales Representative Iain Kenny.

The day looks at the central role of stable beer in keg, can and bottle production and the practical techniques that you can apply to help ensure this. Also covered will be an introduction to the different carbonation, filtration and filling methods available, both as a starting point to begin or an aid to refine in-house production. Advice on selecting the right contract packager and further insight from the team at Applied Minerals will also feature.

If you require that we come to you and/or tailor the day to your particular requirements, then we recommend you request a Murphy Master Class. Our master classes range from a presentation to your staff at your brewery on any of the subjects featured in our training, right through to a full days walk through and detailed assessment of your process. Simply email events@murphyandson.co.uk to find out more.

What should you expect from this year’s malt specifications?

We’ve been discussing the expected malt specifications for the coming year with our malt suppliers and wanted to feed back so you can prepare and tweak your recipes as required.

The malt nitrogens coming into breweries with the new seasons malt are likely to be higher than usual, at around 1.7%. The winters are not expected to be quite as high, but are still above average, predicted at up to 1.5%. This is a result of environmental factors, as last year saw low rainfall which made it harder for the barley to establish properly. Blame the British weather, it’s a national habit and we brewers are no different. You can however, prepare for this and if you need any technical support in doing so, we’re always on hand. The key implications revolve around your use of copper and auxiliary finings, the rates of which will need to be reoptimised once malt is in breweries and will likely increase. You can expect to see the first malts of this harvest in breweries across the country from mid-February onwards.

Could do with a bit more information on the matter? No problem!

It starts with the farmers, who sow different varieties of malting barley in autumn and early winter, known as “winters” and again in spring, known as “springs”, both of which are harvested from early July onwards. The latter are becoming more popular as they tend to be easier to grow but do require more fertiliser to get a decent yield by harvest time. Winters don’t require as much fertiliser making them cheaper for the farmer but extract value to the brewer tends to be less.

In brewing, we refer to the percentage of protein present in the malt as percentage nitrogen, it is quoted on malt analyses and used as a price guide and quality indicator. For example, feed barleys have a high protein content to feed the animals. Brewers however, want nitrogens to be lower, at around 1.4-1.5%. This provides enough yeast growth, flavour and beer foam without any substantial problems with haze, stability and excess yeast growth, above these levels and the later can become an issue. There is therefore, always a focus on this parameter at harvest and purchase time.

How come the percentage nitrogen is predicted as being higher in British malt this year?

The issue is in fact that of last year, where we saw a prolonged dry winter and spring in the main growing regions of the UK, resulting in crops not establishing well. To help crops along, farmers spread higher amounts of fertiliser which in turn pushed the nitrogens up. This is because the fertiliser is taken up by the growing plant and deposited in the developing ears of corn which are the grains harvested as barley for the malt crop. Had they not done this, the crop may well have failed altogether, something which did happen in a small number of districts resulting in some shortage too. The maltsters work with what they get off the fields, blending barleys to get an overall consistency which they can sell to brewers. However from a brewer’s perspective, with already high nitrogens and a limited supply, the quality of malt coming onto the market is weaker when compared to the previous years’ crop. Therefore, the forecast is less stable beer.

As brewers there are various techniques at our disposal to control protein (nitrogen) in the brewing process, and this is where we at Murphys specialise! Carrageenan and auxiliary finings are both process aids that remove this protein. It follows therefore, that brewers will require more of these products to treat the higher nitrogen malt expected this year. Something which we can support with our optimisation services and technical expertise, provided to you by a team of master brewers. Choosing Murphys will be an invaluable decision in 2018.

Like to perform your own optimisations? We’ve just the kit you need!

The Murphy Copper Finings Optimization Kit, which contains all the equipment required, as well as documentation on how to perform your own optimisations.